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Wainwright recently wrote a letter urging politicians to reconsider the Fabric decision, and her own dad offered testimony. Owner John Woodward, the millionaire behind several caravan and entertainment sites, invited press to photograph him smashing its quirky driftwood sign.

If you take ecstasy you are dicing with death, you are going to die. Fabric, which employed two trained medics a night and a respected security firm in Saber, was held up nationally as the gold standard for club management. Care like that gives a person the best chance they could have.

Scoundrel In My Dreams (Runaway Brides, #3) by Celeste Bradley

When I read the report to Wainwright, her eyes widen. Nathalie and Jean-Marc Wainwright as children. Jean-Marc died after an apparent overdose in a UK club in ; Nathalie now advocates for clubs like Fabric. Photo courtesy of Nathalie Wainwright. Wainwright now believes in policies of harm reduction to make drug culture safer.

While opinions collide over how and where drugs should be tested, nightlife hubs across Europe broadly agree that harm reduction saves lives while zero-tolerance endangers them. With such inconvenient truths in mind, Amsterdam provides daytime drug-testing facilities in labs around the city.

Scoundrel In My Dreams

In the liberal Swiss city of Zurich, where festivals provide on-site drug testing for attendees, seven years have passed without party drug deaths. Outside of the Met, which says drug testing sanctions drugs, London authorities have some appetite for such facilities. As a council, we would consider those kind of approaches. Berlin perfectly illustrates that drug tolerance and political common sense can revolutionize an ailing club scene. We want to make it hard for the criminals to sell them drugs. Radical artists and squatters swarmed into abandoned banks, warehouses, power plants, and shopping centers in the East.

Six nightlife figures allied and formed the Club Commission to protect their culture.

Leichsenring, a former promoter and club owner, was elected spokesperson in In the face of aggressive gentrification, the commission plugs clubs, local government, and developers into one network. Financially stable venues foster experimentation, while reverent clubbers embark on sessions that sprawl across liberal opening hours. In Bristol, the twenty-something helped put on nights at the Island, a renovated court complex with underground holding cells, where she and a few mates would throw intense parties lasting several hours.

But Berlin is different.

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Despite that, Celeste doubts London could adopt the model wholesale. People work 9-to People struggle. For Fabric, the price of avoiding an appeal was a strict license rewrite they might have defeated in court: ID scanners, lifetime bans for those seeking drugs, new lighting and CCTV on dancefloors, and a raise on the age of entry to Club purists argue that ID scanners are invasive, vulnerable to identity thieves, and terrifying to those with drugs in even trivial quantities.

It really is a question of finding the balance between giving people freedom and protecting people. I ask whether he thinks Fabric found that balance, or if it was tempting to put the funds towards a full appeal. Kolvin furrows his brow and, with some awkwardness, slides a hand inside his shirt to clasp his shoulder.

They were in an emergency situation. Men part the dancefloor, hoisting up rounds with wobbly hands; the recipients greet them like returning war heroes, all but forgotten in their absence. Strangers offer lone dancers stoic fist bumps, acknowledging their euphoria. Beside me stands Tom, a Fabric patron of 14 years. His friend Dave traveled from Manchester to celebrate the reopening. Both drug-free, Tom and Dave roll eyes at the suggestion tighter rules will constrain clubbers.

As we speak, a group of year-olds tumbles outside, angling for smokes. One tells me his name is Benny, and I offer some Extra for his hectic jaw. This younger clan backs its philosophy—that government drug stigma critically endangers users—with impressive screeds on policy nuances.

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A faint grime beat emerges from within, and the security guard steps aside, smiling, to permit their return to the night. Skip to content Search query All Results.

The Haunted Decks of the Queen Mary

Pitchfork is the most trusted voice in music. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Open share drawer. The scene outside Fabric days after it was forced to close down last September. European cities including Amsterdam and Berlin acknowledge that a certain level of drug tolerance can lead to a safer nightlife culture. As PR wars rage around London real estate, nightclubs have become symbolic battlegrounds for the future identity of London.

And no club has been more tightly entangled in that battle than Fabric. Since opening in , Fabric has survived rampant gentrification, encroaching pseudo-nightclubs, and the epidemic of superclub closures. Founders Keith Reilly and Cameron Leslie set their stall by rejecting superclub status, snubbing bold-name DJs to promote diverse bookings like Asian Underground pioneer Talvin Singh and international crate-digger Gilles Peterson.

That same night, he recalls dreamily, he saw Boards of Canada, Autechre, and Roni Size play sets elsewhere around London. Last August, Fabric closed voluntarily after two more ecstasy-related deaths at the club. But at a hearing in September, the Met stood firm. Two weeks after the decision, Fabric advocate Nathalie Wainwright welcomes me to her flat in east London, apologizing for nonexistent mess.

We chat on the mezzanine, sipping Becks as the last daylight bleeds through the windows. Born in , Wainwright was the second child of middle-class parents. She grew up in North Lincolnshire with her brother, Jean-Marc, a promising artist. Like his friends, Jean-Marc dropped his pills early and kept going. Nobody is sure what happened in the club, or when Jean-Marc consumed an extra batch, but Wainwright believes, at around a. Local police, who had arrested nearly 50 ravers in a previous raid at the club, urged them to tighten health and safety. But the threat from law enforcement proved counterproductive.

Without cell phones, they had little choice but to trust them. Half an hour later, as a friend cradled him in his arms, Jean-Marc had a seizure, then another. Alarmed, the friend noticed Jean-Marc had swallowed his tongue, which he extracted from his throat. Wainwright says the ambulance took 40 minutes to arrive. By the time he got to the hospital, Jean-Marc had suffered lung failure, which led to blood clotting. His cause of death was fluid on the brain. Wainwright recently wrote a letter urging politicians to reconsider the Fabric decision, and her own dad offered testimony. Owner John Woodward, the millionaire behind several caravan and entertainment sites, invited press to photograph him smashing its quirky driftwood sign.

Save the Last Dance: The Fight for London Club Culture

If you take ecstasy you are dicing with death, you are going to die. Fabric, which employed two trained medics a night and a respected security firm in Saber, was held up nationally as the gold standard for club management. Care like that gives a person the best chance they could have. When I read the report to Wainwright, her eyes widen. Nathalie and Jean-Marc Wainwright as children.

Jean-Marc died after an apparent overdose in a UK club in ; Nathalie now advocates for clubs like Fabric. Photo courtesy of Nathalie Wainwright. Wainwright now believes in policies of harm reduction to make drug culture safer. While opinions collide over how and where drugs should be tested, nightlife hubs across Europe broadly agree that harm reduction saves lives while zero-tolerance endangers them. With such inconvenient truths in mind, Amsterdam provides daytime drug-testing facilities in labs around the city.

In the liberal Swiss city of Zurich, where festivals provide on-site drug testing for attendees, seven years have passed without party drug deaths. Outside of the Met, which says drug testing sanctions drugs, London authorities have some appetite for such facilities. As a council, we would consider those kind of approaches. Berlin perfectly illustrates that drug tolerance and political common sense can revolutionize an ailing club scene. We want to make it hard for the criminals to sell them drugs. Radical artists and squatters swarmed into abandoned banks, warehouses, power plants, and shopping centers in the East.

Six nightlife figures allied and formed the Club Commission to protect their culture. Leichsenring, a former promoter and club owner, was elected spokesperson in In the face of aggressive gentrification, the commission plugs clubs, local government, and developers into one network. Financially stable venues foster experimentation, while reverent clubbers embark on sessions that sprawl across liberal opening hours. In Bristol, the twenty-something helped put on nights at the Island, a renovated court complex with underground holding cells, where she and a few mates would throw intense parties lasting several hours.

But Berlin is different. Despite that, Celeste doubts London could adopt the model wholesale. People work 9-to