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The former is frightening in and of itself, the latter for complex, internal reasons. I think the real reason that culture often fears sexuality and violence in children is because they are such natural urges. We fear to trigger them because we cannot control the little beasts. We cannot watch them every minute. So, to write Children's Literature, an author must create something complex and challenging, something that the child can turn over in their mind without accidentally revealing some terrible aspect of the world that the child is not yet capable of dealing with.

Carroll did this by basing his fantasies off of complex, impersonal structures: linguistics and mathematical theory. These things have all the ambiguity, uncertainty, and structure of the grown-up world without the messy, human parts. This is also why the Alice stories fulfill another requirement I have for Children's Lit: that it be just as intriguing and rewarding for adults.

There is no need to limit the depth in books for children, because each reader will come away with whatever they are capable of finding. Fill an attic with treasures and the child who enters it may find any number of things--put a single coin in a room and you ensure that the child will find it, but nothing more. Of course, we must remember that nothing we can write will ever be more strange or disturbing to a child than the pure, unadulterated world that we will always have failed to prepare them for. However, perhaps we can fail a little less and give them Alice.

Not all outlets are to be feared, despite what your parents taught you. In fact, some should be prodded with regularity, and if you dare, not a little joy. View all 7 comments. May 18, J. View 1 comment. Sep 06, emma rated it it was amazing Shelves: owned , classics , alice , i-love-these-characters , children-s , recommend , reread , favorites , beautifully-written , to-review. View all 4 comments.

Jan 30, Ahmed Ejaz rated it liked it Shelves: full-lengths , Life, what is it but a dream? I had guessed that this story would also take place in dream. And surprisingly I was right.. Writing was dull. Just like the last book. But this book did make an improvement in adventures. Those were faaar better than Alice in the Wonderland. I liked the concept of Chess game. I liked the World of Looking-Glass. But I think Wonderland was little better. This was also great. Don't kn Life, what is it but a dream?

Don't know but I liked Wonderland more. Or for my problems regarding this book have only one answer: Classic. This book is written in s.

Through the Looking Glass

So this fact should be kept in mind while reading. That's why no matter how much I would say that would be useless. Regardless, if you are looking forward to read this series, so do it. Don't be discouraged by my reviews of this series. Maybe you would like this series more than I did. January 30, View all 11 comments. Sep 29, Manny rated it it was amazing Shelves: celebrity-death-match , well-i-think-its-funny , if-research-were-romance , why-not-call-it-poetry , life-is-lewis-carroll.

Dumpty, I believe it was? Humpty Dumpty at your service. I must admit, we don't normally like to employ egghead intellectuals The rest of this review is available elsewhere the location cannot be given for Goodreads policy reasons View all 18 comments. I finish college this year 2. I eat all the ice cream I want and it all goes to my boobs 4. I read for a living. I go to the gym 6. I don't fall sleep in the most unusual places e.

Through the Looking Glass

View all 5 comments. Apr 27, Irena rated it it was amazing. I had the strangest dream. I dreamed I found myself in Wonderland, went there trough the looking glass, but while I was there, I couldn't remember what Wonderland looked like. After I woke up, I decided it was the best time for me to finally read this book and find my answers. Now when I was reading it, some pictures from that movie came to my mind, I was remin I had the strangest dream. Now when I was reading it, some pictures from that movie came to my mind, I was reminiscing about some scenes I complitely forgot about.

What took me by surprise was how I knew some quotes even though I couldn't have know them from that very movie. Also, I noticed how some characters that weren't in the first book, but were in Disney's movie for the first time showed up here, in Trough the Looking Glass.


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When I look at them only as books, I can't say I'm sure which story I like better. I think this one made me smile more often, even if I think that Alice in Wonderland has better quotes in it. View all 10 comments. Sep 21, Nandakishore Varma rated it it was amazing Shelves: classic. Alice in Wonderland was almost an institution at our house - but nobody knew about this book. I was tantalised for years by references to it in various other books, and finally succeeded in locating it in a local bookstore.

The looking-glass world is, IMO, weirder than the one underground and decidedly creepier the Jabberwock and those two blackguards, the Walrus and the Carpenter. Also, it contains two of my favourite poems. In fact, Jabberwocky might be the finest nonsense poem ever written i Alice in Wonderland was almost an institution at our house - but nobody knew about this book. In fact, Jabberwocky might be the finest nonsense poem ever written in English. Beware the Jabberwock! The Walrus and the Carpenter they remind me of certain Indian politicians!

Tweedledum and Tweedledee The Red Queen Jun 02, David Sarkies rated it liked it Shelves: childrens. Playing Chess 4 June Hot on the tails of the rabid success of Alice in Wonderland comes the similar, but somewhat different, sequel. The absurdity of this volume is of the same scope as the original, but in many cases, being a sequel, it seems to lack some of the uniqueness of the original. One thing I noticed with regards to the original is that there simply did not seem to be any plot. Thus, the absurdity of the entire volume was complete.

There was no reason for Alice to be there, and no Playing Chess 4 June Hot on the tails of the rabid success of Alice in Wonderland comes the similar, but somewhat different, sequel. There was no reason for Alice to be there, and no goal that she had to reach, and the end simply comes all of a sudden. However, come the sequel, we have a plot and a quest.

Initially Alice simply wants to see what is on the other side of the looking glass, and sure enough, she enters a world that is similar, but different, to our own. In a way it is a world of opposites, so when she is thirsty she is given a biscuit when what she really should have asked for is a biscuit, because more likely than not, she would have been given a drink. The story is based around a game of chess, and there are numerous metaphors in relation to the chess board.

For instance the journey across the third square Alice is a pawn so she starts on the second square is by train which represents the pawns ability to jump the third square. The queen moves at a rapid pace, which is representative of the queens ability to move as far as she likes, and the knight stumbles, representative if the rather odd way that the knight moves. As for the quest, well, as soon as Alice meets the queen she decides that she wants to be a queen, so the queen tells Alice that she must move to the other side of the chess board, and in doing so, she will become a queen which is a rule in the game of chess.

Some have said that the story itself was written by Carol when he was teaching Alice Liddle how to play chess, though I must say that I did not learn all that much about the game of chess in this book. It is interesting how some of the characters from this story make their way into the other story in the more main stream productions though I am not talking about the Tim Burton movie here. For instance Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum seem to appear in the Alice in Wonderland story in the films when in fact they appear in this book.

It is also noticeable and something that I did not realise until I read this was that the poem Jabberwock appears in this book. I always believed that Jabberwock was a poem that Carol had written separately from this book. By the way, this is what a Jabberwocky looks like: I quite like the pictures that Carol put in the book, and some of them seem to be quite absurd in themselves. For instance there is a scene on the train when the ticket inspector comes along and asks Alice for her ticket and I have found myself on the wrong side of a ticket inspector, as we probably all have, though I will also have an aversion towards the ones on the trains in Italy.

Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There

However, it was quite bizarre how he seemed to always look at her through a pair binoculars, like this: The ending was pretty cool as well, because the story ends with her shaking the red queen and suddenly waking up from her dream world and realising that she was doing this: Oh, and look at who also makes an appearance in the story: Not that Humpty actually first appears here.

He was no an invention by Carol, but actually had been around in his own nursery rhyme a long time before hand though according to Wikipedia the first appearance was in a book of nursery rhymes published in , two years before Through the Looking Glass. Sep 21, Brian rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. As a standalone read, the book shows high quality. However only my opinion here of course when I compare this with the first I feel some disappointment. Also, the ideas captivate the imagination: a melting looking glass, going to the other side, a land set as a chessboard, everything going backwards so you think of memories a 3.

Also, the ideas captivate the imagination: a melting looking glass, going to the other side, a land set as a chessboard, everything going backwards so you think of memories ahead instead of backward. The ideas resonate intelligence and style and humor, but the characters lacked in comparison with the first for me.

The characters in the second book lead in from other sources, such as nursery rhymes. The negative aspects in no way take away the greatness of this second book. I wonder how much better it would have been if Carroll had created more of his own characters, because he obviously has talent with this. As a child I remember seeing a movie with real people. I remember the awe and fear of it.

I also remember this terrifying dragon, or dinosaur, called the Jabberwocky, and it scared the boogies out of my nose. I kept watching for this monster to appear in this book but it never came I need to read the poem I guess , and that may be part of the disappointment.

I think that the failure not only of Children's Literature as a whole, but of our very concept of children and the child's mind is that we think it a crime to challenge and confront that mind. Children are first protected from their culture--kept remote and safe--and then they are thrust incongruously into a world that they have been told is unsafe and unsavory; and we expected them not to blanch. It has been my policy that the best literature for children is not a trifling thing, not a simplific I think that the failure not only of Children's Literature as a whole, but of our very concept of children and the child's mind is that we think it a crime to challenge and confront that mind.

It has been my policy that the best literature for children is not a trifling thing, not a simplification of the adult or a sillier take on the world. Good Children's literature is some of the most difficult literature to write because one must challenge, engage, please, and awe a mind without resorting to archetypes or life experience. Once a body grows old enough, we are all saddened by the thought of a breakup. We have a set of knowledge and memories. The pain returns to the surface. Children are not born with these understandings, so to make them understand pain, fear, and loss is no trivial thing.

The education of children is the transformation of an erratic and hedonistic little beast into a creature with a rational method by which to judge the world. A child must be taught not to fear monsters but to fear instead electrical outlets, pink slips, poor people, and lack of social acceptance. The former is frightening in and of itself, the latter for complex, internal reasons. I think the real reason that culture often fears sexuality and violence in children is because they are such natural urges.

We fear to trigger them because we cannot control the little beasts. We cannot watch them every minute. So, to write Children's Literature, an author must create something complex and challenging, something that the child can turn over in their mind without accidentally revealing some terrible aspect of the world that the child is not yet capable of dealing with. Carroll did this by basing his fantasies off of complex, impersonal structures: linguistics and mathematical theory.

These things have all the ambiguity, uncertainty, and structure of the grown-up world without the messy, human parts. This is also why the Alice stories fulfill another requirement I have for Children's Lit: that it be just as intriguing and rewarding for adults. There is no need to limit the depth in books for children, because each reader will come away with whatever they are capable of finding.

Fill an attic with treasures and the child who enters it may find any number of things--put a single coin in a room and you ensure that the child will find it, but nothing more. Of course, we must remember that nothing we can write will ever be more strange or disturbing to a child than the pure, unadulterated world that we will always have failed to prepare them for.

However, perhaps we can fail a little less and give them Alice.


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Not all outlets are to be feared, despite what your parents taught you. In fact, some should be prodded with regularity, and if you dare, not a little joy. View all 7 comments. May 18, J. View 1 comment. Sep 06, emma rated it it was amazing Shelves: owned , classics , alice , i-love-these-characters , children-s , recommend , reread , favorites , beautifully-written , to-review. View all 4 comments. Jan 30, Ahmed Ejaz rated it liked it Shelves: full-lengths , Life, what is it but a dream?

I had guessed that this story would also take place in dream. And surprisingly I was right.. Writing was dull. Just like the last book. But this book did make an improvement in adventures. Those were faaar better than Alice in the Wonderland. I liked the concept of Chess game.

I liked the World of Looking-Glass. But I think Wonderland was little better. This was also great. Don't kn Life, what is it but a dream? Don't know but I liked Wonderland more. Or for my problems regarding this book have only one answer: Classic. This book is written in s. So this fact should be kept in mind while reading.

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That's why no matter how much I would say that would be useless. Regardless, if you are looking forward to read this series, so do it. Don't be discouraged by my reviews of this series. Maybe you would like this series more than I did. January 30, View all 11 comments. Sep 29, Manny rated it it was amazing Shelves: celebrity-death-match , well-i-think-its-funny , if-research-were-romance , why-not-call-it-poetry , life-is-lewis-carroll.

Dumpty, I believe it was? Humpty Dumpty at your service. I must admit, we don't normally like to employ egghead intellectuals The rest of this review is available elsewhere the location cannot be given for Goodreads policy reasons View all 18 comments. I finish college this year 2. I eat all the ice cream I want and it all goes to my boobs 4.


  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.
  • The Times in My Life I!
  • Through the Looking-Glass?
  • Through the Looking Glass Summary.

I read for a living. I go to the gym 6. I don't fall sleep in the most unusual places e. View all 5 comments.

Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll

Apr 27, Irena rated it it was amazing. I had the strangest dream. I dreamed I found myself in Wonderland, went there trough the looking glass, but while I was there, I couldn't remember what Wonderland looked like. After I woke up, I decided it was the best time for me to finally read this book and find my answers. Now when I was reading it, some pictures from that movie came to my mind, I was remin I had the strangest dream. Now when I was reading it, some pictures from that movie came to my mind, I was reminiscing about some scenes I complitely forgot about.

What took me by surprise was how I knew some quotes even though I couldn't have know them from that very movie. Also, I noticed how some characters that weren't in the first book, but were in Disney's movie for the first time showed up here, in Trough the Looking Glass. When I look at them only as books, I can't say I'm sure which story I like better. I think this one made me smile more often, even if I think that Alice in Wonderland has better quotes in it. View all 10 comments. Sep 21, Nandakishore Varma rated it it was amazing Shelves: classic.

Alice in Wonderland was almost an institution at our house - but nobody knew about this book. I was tantalised for years by references to it in various other books, and finally succeeded in locating it in a local bookstore. The looking-glass world is, IMO, weirder than the one underground and decidedly creepier the Jabberwock and those two blackguards, the Walrus and the Carpenter. Also, it contains two of my favourite poems. In fact, Jabberwocky might be the finest nonsense poem ever written i Alice in Wonderland was almost an institution at our house - but nobody knew about this book.

In fact, Jabberwocky might be the finest nonsense poem ever written in English. Beware the Jabberwock! The Walrus and the Carpenter they remind me of certain Indian politicians! Tweedledum and Tweedledee The Red Queen Jun 02, David Sarkies rated it liked it Shelves: childrens. Playing Chess 4 June Hot on the tails of the rabid success of Alice in Wonderland comes the similar, but somewhat different, sequel. The absurdity of this volume is of the same scope as the original, but in many cases, being a sequel, it seems to lack some of the uniqueness of the original.

One thing I noticed with regards to the original is that there simply did not seem to be any plot. Thus, the absurdity of the entire volume was complete. There was no reason for Alice to be there, and no Playing Chess 4 June Hot on the tails of the rabid success of Alice in Wonderland comes the similar, but somewhat different, sequel.

There was no reason for Alice to be there, and no goal that she had to reach, and the end simply comes all of a sudden. However, come the sequel, we have a plot and a quest. Initially Alice simply wants to see what is on the other side of the looking glass, and sure enough, she enters a world that is similar, but different, to our own. In a way it is a world of opposites, so when she is thirsty she is given a biscuit when what she really should have asked for is a biscuit, because more likely than not, she would have been given a drink. The story is based around a game of chess, and there are numerous metaphors in relation to the chess board.

For instance the journey across the third square Alice is a pawn so she starts on the second square is by train which represents the pawns ability to jump the third square. The queen moves at a rapid pace, which is representative of the queens ability to move as far as she likes, and the knight stumbles, representative if the rather odd way that the knight moves. As for the quest, well, as soon as Alice meets the queen she decides that she wants to be a queen, so the queen tells Alice that she must move to the other side of the chess board, and in doing so, she will become a queen which is a rule in the game of chess.

Some have said that the story itself was written by Carol when he was teaching Alice Liddle how to play chess, though I must say that I did not learn all that much about the game of chess in this book. It is interesting how some of the characters from this story make their way into the other story in the more main stream productions though I am not talking about the Tim Burton movie here.

For instance Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum seem to appear in the Alice in Wonderland story in the films when in fact they appear in this book.

Chapter 1. Looking-Glass house

It is also noticeable and something that I did not realise until I read this was that the poem Jabberwock appears in this book. I always believed that Jabberwock was a poem that Carol had written separately from this book. By the way, this is what a Jabberwocky looks like: I quite like the pictures that Carol put in the book, and some of them seem to be quite absurd in themselves.

For instance there is a scene on the train when the ticket inspector comes along and asks Alice for her ticket and I have found myself on the wrong side of a ticket inspector, as we probably all have, though I will also have an aversion towards the ones on the trains in Italy. However, it was quite bizarre how he seemed to always look at her through a pair binoculars, like this: The ending was pretty cool as well, because the story ends with her shaking the red queen and suddenly waking up from her dream world and realising that she was doing this: Oh, and look at who also makes an appearance in the story: Not that Humpty actually first appears here.

He was no an invention by Carol, but actually had been around in his own nursery rhyme a long time before hand though according to Wikipedia the first appearance was in a book of nursery rhymes published in , two years before Through the Looking Glass. Sep 21, Brian rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. As a standalone read, the book shows high quality. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. Alice returns to the whimsical world of Wonderland and travels back in time to help the Mad Hatter.

Director: James Bobin. Writers: Linda Woolverton screenplay , Lewis Carroll books. From metacritic. Top 10 Most Anticipated Summer Movies. Im Kino gesehen. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Learn more More Like This. Alice in Wonderland I Adventure Family Fantasy. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Adventure Comedy Family. Maleficent Action Adventure Family. Cinderella I Drama Family Fantasy. Beauty and the Beast Family Fantasy Musical.

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